This page is under construction.

This page is under construction.

Using 12 years of data on the average number of physical restraints per child per month from the Waterford Country School (WCS), this interrupted time series study demonstrates that the use of physical restraints decreased after CARE was implemented. The 12 years of data for the residential treatment population at WCS were divided into a 6-year baseline phase prior to the start of CARE in January 2009 and a 6-year implementation phase. The vertical line at 0 divides the baseline and implementation periods. The solid blue line to the left of this line represents the trend in the use of physical restraints prior to implementation of CARE. The dotted blue line to the right of this line represents the projected rate of physical restraints if CARE was not implemented. The steadily decreasing solid blue line during the implementation phase demonstrates the decrease in the use of physical restraints. This result is described in more detail in a 2015 publication in the journal Child Welfare. Nunno, M. A., Smith, E. G., Martin, W. R., & Butcher, S. (2015). Benefits of Embedding Research into Practice: An Agency-University Collaboration. Child Welfare, 94(3).

In this figure summarizing an interrupted time series analysis, the start of CARE implementation is represented by the vertical line at 0 on the horizontal axis.  Before the start of CARE, the use of psychotropic medications was increasing.  After the start of CARE, the use of psychotropic medication decreased, though the amount of the decrease depended upon the prescriber. 

Smith, E.G., Nunno, M.A., Martin, W.R., & Sellers, D.E. (2019, April). Does the CARE Program Model Reduce Use of Psychotropic Medications in Residential Care? Poster presented at the 63rd Annual Conference of the Association of Children’s Residential Centers, New Orleans, LA.

 

This panel is under construction.

This panel is under construction.

In 2017, CARE was listed on the California Evidence-Based Clearinghouse with a Level 3 Scientific Rating and High Child Welfare Relevance. From 2007 to 2009 the Children and Residential Experiences: Creating Conditions for Change (CARE) program was pilot tested in 8 agencies.  From 2009 to 2015, the Duke Endowment funded a rigorous evaluation of the CARE program model. The results of these evaluations and other studies are listed in boxes. Click on a result below to get more information.

 

College of Human Ecology, Cornell University

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